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Gendered English Words and Neutral Alternatives

Two Heads Graphic Courtesy of ETFO Voice

Two Heads Graphic Courtesy of ETFO Voice

Welcome to the ultimate guide to gendered English words and their gender-neutral alternatives. Why would you want such a list? That’s really up to you; this is not a political post or site—it’s a practical one related to my writing and writings. With that in mind I’ve developed a comprehensive gender-neutral standard English structure and vocabulary to solve practical, long-term technical problems with legal contracts, business documentation, fiction writing (including my own), politicized discourse and clear communication generally.

As such, there are two ways to use this list:

  1. Embrace the full Humanist Gender-Neutral English (HGNE) standard, including gender-neutral prefixes and suffixes, OR
  2. Just check out the list of gendered terms with their new and existing neutral alternatives.

What you get out of this is up to you, but my sincere hope is that this standard be adopted over time for all types of spoken and written communication, so we can all move onto other problems like, I don’t know, curing cancer. So…enjoy.

And if you just want to see a full glossary of words without all the explanation, go here.

What’s in the List (and What’s Not)

One goal of this list (and each sub-list) is to provide enough detail and sufficient examples for clarity, but not much more. Another is to provide easy reference for most commonly used words or phrases. Beyond that, here’s what’s included or not:

What’s Included?

  • Many modern / current words that are gendered by their nature and in current usage, meaning they might have a masculine or feminine prefix (e.g., manhandle), suffix (e.g., lawman), etc.—in other words, grammatically masculine and feminine nouns. This includes gendered job roles, within reason. There are nearly two-thousand such words, and listing them all would be pointless.
  • A bias toward clarity, simplicity and universality—and avoiding the erasure of professions and identities to create false synonyms (e.g., a meteorologist and a weather person are not the same thing).
  • Some words that display bias or even hate toward a gender, for reference and discussion (e.g., barren or impotent), even if gender neutrality isn’t really the point.
  • Some words that don’t have or don’t need gender-neutral alternatives, largely for discussion (e.g., spinster, cuckhold) that we could be better off just not using.

What’s Excluded?

  • Most words that are not intrinsically gendered, even if their application tends to be (e.g., bossy). These words or phrases relate to political rather than grammatical or linguistic neutrality, which is perfectly legitimate, but not the focus of this standard.
  • All (possibly) politically adjacent terminology (e.g., words relating to LGBTQIA+ people that you shouldn’t use for other reasons), which largely deal with application rather than nature. There are many other words you should omit to avoid being a jerk, which is great, but again not the focus of this article. However, I’ve also tried to avoid alternative terminology used by the queer community for similar reasons, even if the word might otherwise be a cool neutral option.
  • Archaic and less common words. This list is meant to be sufficiently comprehensive to make usage clear and show how the standard works, not to make a list of every gendered English word that anyone has ever used. But if you think a word has been erroneously omitted, let me know.

For more background, check out the full guide to New Humanist Gender Neutral English, the ‘standard’ that is applied to everything below.

For the most part, definitions, discussion and other details are left for a separate article, but in some cases explanation might be required—and is then provided at the end of each list.

What Might Offend or Trigger…Someone

I mean, who knows, but a few things are worth noting:

  • The word or phrase in the first column of each list is usually the most common gendered form, often defaulting to male for ease of reference, but is not meant to imply anything; it’s just that most of the words that need neutralizing are male in current usage.
  • Some intrinsically political words (e.g., mansplain) are included for thoroughness, but I can easily see why some would object to offering a neutral term at all. Which is fine; just skip past those sections and move along. I’m not making a political statement, but I’m also not going to omit things to favor one group or another.
  • Gender neutral language is not just about any one group of people or being politically correct, so even if you’re on the far right, it’s useful to have neutral language for business and legal agreements. This doesn’t have to be political. Think ‘making capitalism more efficient.’

Of course, if I get anything truly wrong, I’d love to hear about it.

And now, this list!

List of Gendered English Words

The following list of gendered words and their neutral alternatives is broken into several smaller lists for readability and context. This includes initial lists defining the base gender-neutral English standard root nouns and affixes (prefixes or suffixes). You can skip these if you’re just interested in the lists of gendered nouns. These new words and affixes are then applied in later tables to create gender-neutral options.

Gender-Neutral List Key

What kind of list needs a key? Well, this one. So here we go:

  • Humanist Gender-Neutral English (HGNE) standard words and phrases are shown in bold green italics, largely so this list is accessible to those with color-related challenges.
  • Common alternative words that are inappropriate or misleading (for this standard) are shown in red strikethrough. Generally but not always, the bold green words are meant to replace the red strikethrough ones. Some words that are not recommended for other reasons (e.g., being unnecessary) are shown in regular strikethrough. The color distinction shouldn’t matter for those who can’t see red.
  • If there are two or more plausible neutral terms, the suggested default is shown in bold with a (D). Often, as when gendered words continue to be useful or appropriate options, there is no default.
  • If you see ‘TBD’, this means there isn’t yet an obvious solution, but suggestions are welcome.
  • In general, the solution provided applies to all forms of a word (singular, plural, verb, adjective, noun, etc.), but in some cases examples are provided for clarity.

So, enough preamble. Let’s get started…

Gendered English Pronouns

This covers pronouns such as he / she / him / her, etc., where the pronoun root ‘hu’ is used as the foundation for all neutral pronouns. This is derived from (and pronounced like) humans in order to be unifying, non-gendered and humanist.

Condition
(Pronoun is)
Singular
Pronouns
Plural
Pronouns
Subject He
She
Hu
They *
It
They
Object Him
Her
Hum
Them *
It
Them
Possessive His / His
Hers / Her
Hus / Hus
Their / Theirs *
Its / Its
Their / Theirs

See the HGNE standard for pronouns for more details on background, usage, etc.

(*) They. The pronoun ‘they’ is shown in singular forms for obvious reasons, and is encouraged for individual use in personal identification as desired (along with any other personally preferred pronoun), but is discouraged for general communication where hu can be used (with less numerical ambiguity).

Gendered Nouns & Affixes (Base)

This refers to the use of man / woman / boy / girl / etc. as a noun or affix. Use instead ‘homas a neutral alternative for adult man or woman, as both noun and affix, where appropriate. This is derived from hominid (our primate family), and also alludes to the unifying prefix hum-in humanity. For similar reasons, use ‘hem‘ in place of boy or girl, and ‘-um’ in place of other gendered suffixes (e.g., -ess).

Noun Singular Plural
Adult Man
Woman
Hom
Men
Women
Homs
+ Adult, Person, Human, etc. + Adults, Persons, People, Humans, etc.
Child Boy
Girl
Hem
Boys
Girls
Hems
+ Child, Kid, Teenager, Tween, Baby, Infant, Toddler, etc. + Children, Kids, Teenagers, Tweens, Babies, Infants, Toddlers, etc.
Alternative
Suffix
NA (*)
-ess / -ette / -ina / -ix
-um
NA (*)
-esses / -ettes / -inas / -ix
-ums

See the HGNE standard for hom/homs, hem/hems and um/ums for more details on background, usage, pronunciation, etc.

(*) NA (Male Suffixes). While many, many words can be regarded as masculine historically by their suffix (e.g., the -or in actor), the trend now is to make these terms gender-neutral, ignore the historical gender, and stop using the legacy female version (e.g., actress. This makes life far simpler, and results in far fewer gendered words, so we follow that standard where possible.

Nouns Gendered by -Man or -Woman (Adult)

This list includes words or phrases where ‘man’ or ‘woman’ follow another word, even if not technically as a suffix (e.g., common man, odd man out, etc.).

Note that the use of ‘-hom’ might not always be the right or only gender-neutral solution; where possible, it’s strongly suggested we just use an existing generic term and get rid of extraneous gendered options (e.g., just use actor, always, and never actress). Some guidelines:

  • This standard avoids the use of ‘person’ or ‘people’ as gender-neutral terms if possible, as it’s less human and familiar than -man, -woman or -hom, but of course both remain options as desired.
  • The ‘-hom‘ form is always available as an option, in case you don’t like another suggested neutral term (if there is one) or you can’t remember any other option (e.g., when public speaking or mid-conversation).

Note that most of these nouns are job roles, but nowhere near all job roles are shown (e.g., you could make a job role for anything like, say, ice cream, by calling someone an ice cream man), and you can generally figure out how to apply the standard regardless. According to the Free Dictionary, there are 1,554 words ending in -man and 132 words ending in woman. All of them can be made neutral by using hom.

Word
or Phrase
Singular Plural
Anchor (News) Anchorman
Anchorwoman
Anchorhom
Anchor
-men
-women
-homs
Anchors
Assemblyman Assemblyman
Assemblywoman
Assemblyhom
Assemblyperson
-men
-women
-homs
-persons, -people
Businesswoman Businessman
Businesswoman
Businesshom
Businessperson
-men
-women
-hom
-person, -people
Cameraman Cameraman
Camerawoman
Camerahom (D)
Cameraperson
-men
-women
homs (D)
-persons
Chairwoman Chairman
Chairwoman
Chairhom (D)
Chair
Chairperson
-men
-women
-homs (D)
Chairs
-persons, -people
Common Man Common Man
Common Woman
Common Hom
Common Person
– Men
– Women
Homs
-Persons, -People
Clergyman Clergyman
Clergywoman
Clergyhom
Minister
Pastor
-men
-women
-homs
Ministers
Pastors
Congresswoman Congressman
Congresswoman
Congresshom
Congressperson
-men
-women
-homs
-persons, -people
Construction Man (1) Construction Man
Construction Woman
Construction Hom (D)
Construction Worker
– Men
– Women
– Homs (D)
– Workers
Councilman Councilman
Councilwoman
Councilhom
Councilperson
-men
-women

-homs
-persons
Craftsman Craftsman
Craftswoman
Craftshom
Craftsperson
Artisan
-men
-women

-homs
-persons, -people
Artisans
Crew Woman Crewman
Crew Woman
Crewhom (D)
Crew Member
Crew Person
-men
-women

-homs (D)
– Members
-Persons, People
Doorman Doorman
Door Woman
Doorhom
Door Keeper

Attendant
-men
-Women

-homs
– Keepers (D)
-Attendants
Firefighter Fireman
Firewoman
Firehom
Firefighter
-men
-women

-homs
-fighters (D)
Freshman (1) Freshman
Freshwoman
Fresh Hom (D)
First Year
-men
-women
– Homs (D)
-First Years
Fisherwoman Fisherman
Fisherwoman
Fisherhom
-men
-women
-homs
Foreman Foreman
Forewoman
Forehom
Supervisor, Boss
-men
-women
-homs
Supervisors, Bosses
Garbageman Garbageman
Garbagewoman
Garbagehom
Garbage Collector
-men
-women
-homs
-Collectors
Handywoman Handyman
Handywoman
Handyhom
Maintenance Person, Fixer
-men
-women
-homs
– Persons, Fixers
Layman Layman
Laywoman
Layhom
-men
-women
-homs
Longshoreman Longshoreman
Longshore Woman
Longshorehom
Stevedore
-men
-women
-homs
Stevedores
Mailwoman Mailman
Mailwoman
Mailhom
Mail Carrier (D)
Postal Worker
-men
-women
-homs
– Carriers (D)
Postal Workers
Maintenance Man Maintenance Man
Maintenance Woman
Maintenance Hom
Janitor
– Men
– Women
– Homs
Janitors
Odd Man Out Odd Man Out
Odd Woman Out
Odd Hom Out (D)
Odd Person Out
– Men –
– Women –
– Homs – (D)
– People –
Policewoman Policeman
Policewoman
Policehom
Police Officer (D)
-men
-women
-homs
– Officers (D)
Postman Postman
Postwoman
Posthom
Postal Worker (D)
-men
-women
-homs
– Workers (D)
Saleswoman Salesman
Saleswoman
Sales Hom
Salesperson
-men
-woman
– Homs
persons
Stuntman Stuntman
Stuntwoman
Stunt Hom
Stuntperson
-men
-woman
Homs
-persons
Weatherman Weatherman
Weatherwoman
Weatherhom
Meteorologist
-men
-women
-homs
Meteorologists

See the HGNE standard (hom/homs) for more details on background, usage, pronunciation, etc.

(1) Suffix vs. Separate Word. By convention, if the what’s being replaced is a separate word (e.g, construction man) then the replacement is also a separate word (construction hom). This is also true for suffixes if preceded by a T or S, as in freshman, where freshhom or freshom might be confusing.

Nouns Gendered by Other Suffixes (Adult)

This covers cases where -man-or -woman is not the gendering suffix. Use “um” or “-ums” for any such words (e.g., ending -ess, -ette) to create a non-gendered alternative. Or, if easier, just eliminate unnecessary gender distinction.

Word Singular Plural
Alum (1) Alumnus
Alumna
Alumnum
Alumni (D)
Alumni (Alumnae)
Alumni
Actor Actor (D)
Actress
Actrum
Actors (D)
Actresses
Actrums
Author Author (D)
Authoress
Authum
Authors (D)
Authoresses
Authums
Aviator Aviator (D)
Aviatrix
Aviatrum
Aviators (D)
Aviatrix
Aviatrums
Bachelor (1) Bachelor
Bachelorette (Spinster)
Bachelum
Bachelors
Bachelorettes (Spinsters)
Bachelums
Baron Baron
Baroness
Baronum
Baron
Baroness
Baronums
Comedian Comedian (D)
Comedienne
Comedium
Comedians (D)
Comediennes
Comediums
Count Count
Countess
Countum
Count
Countess
Countums
Czar Czar
Czarina
Czarum
Czars
Czarinas
Czarums
Duke Duke
Duchess
Duchum
Dukes
Duchess
Duchums
Emerit (1) Emeritus
Emerita
Emerit
Emeritum
Emeriti
Emeriti (Emeritae)
Emeriti
Emeritums
Emperor Emperor
Empress
Emperum
Emperors
Empresses
Emperums
Flight Attendant Steward
Stewardess
Flight Attendant (D)
Stewardum
Stewards
Stewardesses
Flight Attendants (D)
Stewardums
God God (D)
Goddess
Godum
God (D)
Goddesses
Godums
Heir Heir (D)
Heiress
Heirum
Heirs (D)
Heiresses
Heirums
Hero Hero (D)
Heroine
Herum
Heroes (D)
Heroines
Herums
Host Host (D)
Hostess
Hostum
Hosts (D)
Hostesses
Hostums
Landlord (2) Landlord
Landlady
Landlodum
Landlords
Landladies
Landlodums
Latino (3) Latino
Latina
Latinum
Latinx
Latinos
Latinas
Latinums
Latinxs
Manager Manager (D)
Manageress
Managerum
Managers (D)
Manageresses
Managerums
Misogyny Misandry/ist
Misogyny/ist
Misanthropy/ist
Misandries/ists
Misogynies/ists
Misanthropies/ists
Poet Poet (D)
Poetess
Poetum
Poets (D)
Poetesses
Poetums
Prince (4) Prince
Princess
Princum
Princes
Princesses
Pincums
Usher Usher (D)
Usherette
Usherum
Ushers (D)
Usherettes
Usherums
Waiter Waiter
Waitress
Waitrum
Waitron
Server
Waiters
Waitresses
Waitrums
Waitrons
Servers
Widow Widower
Widow
Widum
+ Surviving Spouse
Widowers
Widows
Widums
+ Surviving Spouse

See the HGNE standard (um/ums) for more details on background, usage, pronunciation, etc.

(1) Latin Words. For these words, ‘-um’ fits naturally as a singular suffix, but ‘-ums’ will likely offend the Latin purist. Sorry? Better ideas welcome.

(2) Landlord. Lodum is the suggested gender-neutral alternative, because this is the new word for Lord/Lady as titles. See Other Gendered Words for details.

(3) Latino. If needed, Latinum is suggested in place of Latinx, but honestly this should be left to Latinos/Latinas to come up with a preferred solution, if any. So think of this as a place keeper that fits the standard.

(4) Prince. The C in the Princum gender-neutral word here is pronounced like an S, to avoid confusion with an existing word and for consistency.

Nouns Gendered by Prefix (Adult)

These are words and phrases gendered by prefixes man / woman / matron / patron / etc. There are some controversial entries in this list, I imagine, but keep in mind that the goal is gender neutrality. There are some who will want to hang onto the gendered form of a given word for political reasons, and of course that is their prerogative.

Word
or Phrase
Singular Plural
Fraternal Fraternal
Sororal
TBD
NA
Fraternity Fraternity
Sorority
TBD
+ Panhel
Fraternities
Sororities
TBD
+ Panhels
History (1) History (D)
Herstory
Hustory
Hxstory
Histories (D)
Herstories
Hustories
Hxstories
Manhandle Manhandle

Homhandle (D)
NA
Man-hour Man-hour
Woman-hour
Hom-hour (D)
Man-hours
Woman-hours
Hom-hours (D)
Manhunt Manhunt
Womanhunt
Homhunt (D)
Hunt
Manhunts
Womanhunts
Homhunts (D)
Hunts
Womankind Mankind
Womankind
Homkind
Humankind
NA
Man-made Man-made
Woman-made
Hom-made
NA
Artificial, synthetic, machine-made
Manpower Manpower
Womanpower
Hompower

Labor, Work
NA
Manservant Manservant
Womanservant
Homservant
Servant (D)
Manservants
Womanservants
Homservants
Servants (D)
Manslaughter (2) Manslaughter

Homslaughter (D)
NA
Mansplain (3) Mansplain/ing/er
Femsplain/ing/er
Homsplain/ing/er
Mansplain/ing/ers
Femsplain/ing/ers
Homsplain/ing/ers
Manspread (4) Manspread/ing/er
Femspread/ing/er
Homspread/ing/er
Manspread/ing/ers
Femspread/ing/ers
Homspread/ing/ers
Feminine Masculine
Feminine
TBD
+ Non-Binary, Fluid, etc.
NA
Matron
(Older Woman)

Matron

Matrons
Matronize (5)
(Make Matronly)

Matronize
NA
Parental Paternal
Maternal
Parental
Paternal
Maternal
Parental
Patriarch Patriarch/al/y
Matriarch/al/y
Homtriarch/al/y
Patriarchs
Matriarchs
Homtriarch/al/y
Patron (6)
(Sponsor)
Patron
Patrones
TBD
Patrons
Patronesses
TBD
Patronage Patronage
Matronage
Hom
NA
Patronizing (7)
(Condescending)
Patronizing
Matronizing
Homtronizing
+ Condescending, Belittling
NA
Romantic Partner Man Friend
Woman Friend
Hom Friend
+ Partner, Significant Other
Man Friends
Woman Friends
Hom Friends
+ Partners,
Significant Others
Womanize Manize/er/ing
Womanize/er/ing
Homanize/er/ing
Manizers
Womanizers
Homanizers

See the HGNE standard (hom/homs) for more details on background, usage, pronunciation, etc.

(1) History. It’s a myth that the ‘his’ is history comes from anything gendered, or means ‘his story’; his, in this case, has nothing to do with the male pronoun, so gendering it makes as much sense as saying the ‘his’ in histolysis or Hispanic comes from the male pronoun. History is gender neutral already, but if you want to make a political point, gendered and neutral options are shown (but discouraged).

(2) Manslaughter. This a legal term and not easily changed, so manslaughter is with us for a while, standard or not.

(3) Mansplain. This refers to a (predominantly) male habit of talking down to women, even when those women know more than they do on a topic; however, it is not entirely done by men, and thus the alternative femsplain has entered the language (even if mostly reactionarily). Homsplain is thus suggested as a general term for those speaking condescendingly to others based on gender stereotypes or other misconceptions.

(4) Manspread. Referring to men spreading their legs to take up (too much) space in public, homspread is offered as a neutral alternative to cover anyone taking up too much public space in any way (physically, vocally, etc.).

(5/7) Matronize/ing / Patronizing. These words don’t mean the same thing, so are not male / female counterparts. Matronizing (condescending, not making matronly) is sometimes used as the female version of patronizing (condescending, not shopping), and Homtronizing is offered as a general analog to being condescending.

(6) Patron (Patronage). This refers to being a sponsor of or customer of a person or business (various forms), and has no existing female or neutral equivalent.

Nouns Gendered by Affix (Children)

Many words describing children are gendered by boy / girl just as they are for adults with man / woman. In the case of children (of any age), -boy and -girl are replaced by the gender-neutral ‘hem‘ to create a  neutral term.

Word
or Phrase
Singular Plural
Boy Toy Boy Toy
Girl Toy
Hem Toy
Plaything
Boy Toys
Girl Toys
Hem Toys
Playthings
Girl Boss (1) Boss (D)
Girl Boss
Bosses (D)
Girl Bosses
Cabin Boy Cabin Boy
Cabin Girl
Cabin Hem
-Boys
-Girls
– Hems
Girl Friday Boy Friday
Girl Friday
Hem Friday
Boys Friday
Girls Friday
Hems Friday
Romantic Partner Boyfriend
Girlfriend
Hemfriend
+ Partner, Significant Other
Boyfriends
Girlfriends
Hemfriends
+ Partners. Significant Others, etc.

See the HGNE standard (hem/hems) for more details on background, usage, pronunciation, etc.

(1) Girl Boss. This will of course continue to be used, although increasingly cheugy and counterproductive.

Other Gendered Words and Phrases

These are gendered words that are do not include boy / girl / man, woman or other common affixes, or they’re different in some other way. This is by no means a complete list, but hopefully covers enough to clarify usage. It’s certainly a hot mess.

Word
or Phrase
Singular Plural
Gendered Relationships
Child Son
Daughter
Child
Sons
Daughters
Children
Grandparent Grandfather
Grandmother
Grandparent
Grandfather
Grandmother
Grandparent
Marital Partner Husband
Wife
Spouse
+ (Life) Partner, Significant Other
Husbands
Wives
Spouses
+ (Life) Partners, Significant Others
Parent Father / Dad
Mother / Mom
Parent
Fathers / Dads
Mothers / Moms
Parents
Parental () Paternal
Maternal
Parental
Paternal
Maternal
Parental
Parental Sibling XXX Uncle
AuntAuncle
Pibling
+ Zizi, Bibi, Nini, Titi
Not Solved
Uncles
AuntsAuncle
+ Pibling
Not Solved
Sibling Brother
Sister
Sibling
Brothers
Sisters
Siblings
Sibling-hood Brotherhood
Sisterhood
Siblinghood
Brotherhoods
Sisterhoods
Siblinghoods
Sibling Child XXX Nephew
Niece

+Nibling, Niephling, Chibling, Sibkid, etc.
Nephews
Nieces

Niblings
Gendered Job Roles & Titles
Bride Bride
Groom
TBD
+ Marrier, Celebrant
Brides
Brooms
TBD
+ Marriers, Celebrants
King King
Queen
TBD
+ Quing, Majesty?
Kings
Queens
TBD
+ Quings, Majesties? 
Lord (1) Lord
Lady
Lodum
+ Liege
Lords
Ladies
Lodums
+ Lieges
Midwife TBD
Midwife
TBD
TBD
Midwives
TBD
Master Master
Mistress
Maistrum
+ Mastress
Masters
Mistresses
Maistrums
+ Mastresses
Nurse Murse?
Nurse
Nurse / TBD
Murses?
Nurses
Nurses / TBD
Wizard Warlock, Wizard
Witch, Wizard
Witch, Wizard
+ Sorcerer, Magician, etc.
Warlocks, Wizards
Witches, Wizards
Witches, Wizards
+ Sorcerers, Magicians, etc.
Gendered Groups
Dude / Guy (1) Dude / Guy
Chick / Gals
Homie
Dudes / Guys
Chicks / Gals
Homies
+ Thude + Thudes, Folks, People, Humans, Everyone / Everybody, Y’all, Peeps, etc.
Ladies &
Gentlemen
Gentleman
Lady
Adhom
+ Guest, Distinguished Guest, etc.
Gentlemen
Ladies
Adhoms
+ Everyone, Guests,
Distinguished Guests, etc.
Other including Insults & Profanity
Sterile Sterile
Infertile
Barren, Infecund
Sterile
Sterile (Infertile)
Sterile
Cuckhold Cuckhold NA
Impotent
(as Powerless)
Impotent Powerless
Jerk Douche / Dick / Cock +
Bitch / Cunt / Pussy +
Asshole
Jerk
+ Many Others
Bastard Bastard NA

See the HGNE standard (special cases) for more details on background, usage, pronunciation, etc.

Gendered Honorifics

This list is for words used to acknowledge a title or confer respect, though the titles are nouns (e.g. King / Queen) listed elsewhere.

Word Singular Plural
Mr. / Ms. Mr.
Ms. (Mrs. / Miss)
Mu.
Mx.
NA
Sir / Madam (1) Sir
Ma’am / Madam
Adhom
Sirs
Ma’ams / Madams
Adhoms

See the HGNE standard (honorifics) for more details on background, usage, pronunciation, etc.

(1) Adhom. As a neutral alternative to Sir or Ma’am, Adhom is suggested by combining “ad” with “hom” to give the word a sense of elevation and formality, kind of like admiration (not speaking etymologically). There is to the best of knowledge no other alternative in usage. Adhom sounds a bit like ad hominem, but I doubt that’s a major issue, and given the identical pronunciation, it might even be helpful.

(+) Royal Honorifics. To the best of my knowledge, Your Highness, Holiness, Honor, Grace, Lordship, Majesty and Worship and most such honorifics are gender neutral (except Lordship). More on this TBD.

Gender-Neutral Language Resources

This is a work in progress, but for now, this is what’s available on this site:

What’s Next?

First, if you have any questions, comments or criticisms, please let me know in the comments below. All civilized input welcome. Second, if you agree this new humanist (gender neutral and inclusive English) can be useful, promote it. Put it in practice. Send others here to learn and engage. And thank you.

Peace

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